Moths of North Carolina
Scientific Name:
Common Name:
Family (Alpha):
« »
View PDFGracillariidae Members: 11 NC Records

Cameraria obstrictella (Clemens, 1859) - No Common Name



view caption

view caption

view caption

view caption
Taxonomy
Family: GracillariidaeP3 Number: 330373.00 MONA Number: 831.00
Comments: Cameraria is a genus of leaf-mining micromoths. Many species are stenophagous and specialize on a small number of closely related host species. There are currently more than 50 described species in North America.
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, iNaturalist, Google, BAMONATechnical Description, Adults: Clemens (1859); Braun (1908)Technical Description, Immature Stages: Clemens (1859); Braun (1908)                                                                                 
Adult Markings: The following is based on the description by Clemens (1859) and Braun (1908). The palps are whitish. The face is white and tinged with reddish orange that deepens towards the vertex. The head tuft, thorax, and ground color of the forewing are all reddish orange, and the antenna is dark gray above. The forewing has silvery markings that are dark margined externally. At about one-third the wing length there is a silvery fascia that is very indistinctly angulated near the costa, and nearer the base on the dorsal margin. Just beyond the middle of the wing length there is a straight perpendicular fascia, and at about three-fourths a pair of opposite silvery streaks. These are often united in the middle of the wing to form a third fascia. The apex has a velvety blackish brown patch, with a few silvery scales immediately before the patch. The cilia are mostly reddish brown, but transition to gray at the tornus. A dark brown line extends through the middle of the cilia. The hindwing and cilia are blackish brown, while the abdomen is blackish brown in the female and gray in the male. The legs are pale brownish gray, with the tarsi whitish, and shaded with gray toward their bases. Braun (1908) noted that C. obstrictella can be distinguished from all other allied eastern species by the black scales which form the apical dusting and do not reach the tornus as in C. guttifinitella. These scales are more freely tipped with black than is usual and form a large black spot or patch rather than a number of small dots as seen in some species.
Wingspan: Expanse 7-8 mm (Braun, 1908)
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Immatures and Development: The larvae produce upperside mines on oaks. According to Braun (1908), the mine is typically a rather broad Y-shaped track that sometimes crossing the midrib. In some cases the mines do not fork. Two White Oak leaves that were observed in Buncombe Co. had communal mines with two larvae per leaf. The mines tended to be placed along lateral veins, were often broadly lobed, and the fecal pellets were located centrally near the veins. One communal mine from Madison Co. on a seedling White Oak contained seven larvae and was similar to the Buncombe Co. specimens in having several lobes and frass deposited away from the edges of the mine. Another contained a single larva, but was damaged, with some of the larvae possibly removed by a predator. Local populations appear to have at least two broods per year, and pupation occurs within the mine. An adult from Madison Co. that was reared from a mine collected in the summer did not produce a nidus, while larvae collected in the fall from Buncombe Co. did. Specimens that were observed by Braun (1908) produced a flat, oval, silken-cocoon (nidus) that was spun near the fork of the mine. The fall brood overwinters in the leaves, and the adults emerged the following spring.
Larvae ID Requirements: Identifiable only through rearing to adulthood.
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution: Cameraria obstrictella is a seemingly rare species, with only a few scattered records from the eastern US. Specimens have been found in Maine, New Hampshire, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Kentucky, Michigan and North Carolina, where it appears to reach the southern limit of its range. While most of our records come from the Mountains, a record for this species was obtained in 2021 from a site in the eastern Piedmont, where a mine was found on Quercus lyrata, a swamp-forest species.
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Immature Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: Specimens have been documented from March through August, with a seasonal peak in July. As of 2021, we have a larval records from June and early October that are presumably from two different broods.
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: The larvae feed on oaks and are associated with mesic to dry hardwood forests with oaks.
Larval Host Plants: Braun (1908) listed the hosts as White Oak (Quercus alba), Chinquapin Oak (Q. muehlenbergii), and Northern Red Oak (Q. rubra). Our records are mainly from White Oak but a mine was found in 2021 on Overcup Oak.
Observation Methods: The adults have rarely been collected and most records are based on adults that were reared from mines on oaks.
Wikipedia
See also Habitat Account for General Oak-Hickory Forests
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: GNR [S2S3]
State Protection:
Comments: This appears to be a rare species that has only been documented at a few scattered localities in the eastern US. It was discovered in North Carolina in 2020, and more information is needed on its distribution and abundance before we can fully assess its conservation status.

 Photo Gallery for Cameraria obstrictella - No common name

Photos: 22

Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-10-14
McDowell Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-10-14
McDowell Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Jim Petranka, John Petranka, Becky Elkin, and Steve Hall on 2021-09-28
Durham Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Jim Petranka, John Petranka, Becky Elkin, and Steve Hall on 2021-09-28
Durham Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-09-12
Madison Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2021-09-12
Madison Co.
Comment:
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-09-06
McDowell Co.
Comment: Occupied mine with three larvae was on a seedling White Oak.
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-09-06
McDowell Co.
Comment: Occupied mine with three larvae was on a seedling White Oak.
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-08-04
Madison Co.
Comment: An adult that was reared from a mine on a White Oak seedling. Mine was collected on 12 July; adult emerged on 4 August, 2021.
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-07-15
Madison Co.
Comment: An specimen that was reared from a communal mine on a White Oak seedling. The mine was collected on June 27 and the adult emerged on 14 July. (see companion photos on the mine).
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-07-12
Madison Co.
Comment: An occupied mine on a White Oak seedling. The mine was collected on 12 July; adult emerged on 4 August, 2021 (see companion photo).
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-07-12
Madison Co.
Comment: A backlit image of an occupied mine on a White Oak seedling. The mine was collected on 12 July; adult emerged on 4 August, 2021 (see companion photo).
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-06-27
Madison Co.
Comment: A communal mine on a White Oak seedling that contained seven larvae; an adult emerged on 2021-07-15.
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-06-27
Madison Co.
Comment: A mine on a White Oak seedling.
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-06-27
Madison Co.
Comment: A backlit image of a communal mine on a White Oak seedling that contained seven larvae; an adult emerged on 2021-07-15.
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-03-20
Buncombe Co.
Comment: This adult was reared from a larva collected from a White Oak leaf mine. The mine was collected on 8 October, 2020; the adult emerged on 20 March, 2021 after being kept at room temp for about two weeks (see companion photo of the mines).
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-03-19
Buncombe Co.
Comment: This adult was reared from a larva collected from a White Oak leaf mine. The mine was collected on 8 October, 2020; the adult emerged on 19 March, 2021 after being kept at room temp for about two weeks (see companion photo of the mines).
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-03-19
Buncombe Co.
Comment: This adult was reared from a larva collected from a White Oak leaf mine. The mine was collected on 8 October, 2020; the adult emerged on 19 March, 2021 after being kept at room temp for about two weeks (see companion photo of the mines).
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-03-19
Buncombe Co.
Comment: This adult was reared from a larva collected from a White Oak leaf mine. The mine was collected on 8 October, 2020; the adult emerged on 19 March, 2021 after being kept at room temp for about two weeks (see companion photo of the mines).
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2020-10-08
Buncombe Co.
Comment: The leaf had a communal mine with two individuals. Note the nidus in the middle lobe and the larvae that was actively mining in the terminal lobe.
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2020-10-08
Buncombe Co.
Comment: The leaf had a communal mine with two individuals. Note the nidus in the middle lobe and the larvae that was actively mining in the terminal lobe.
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2020-10-08
Buncombe Co.
Comment: Leaf mines were on upper surfaces of White Oak leaves; two leaves each had two larvae. Adults were reared and emerged on 19 March after wintering in the refrigerator.