The Dragonflies and Damselflies of North Carolina
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North Carolina's 189 Odonate species

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Sort Species by: Family   Scientific Name       [ Undocumented ]
Related Species in LIBELLULIDAE: Number of records for 2023 = 0
Added in 2023 from a previous years = 2

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e.g., flight data, high counts, and earliest/latest dates can be seen.
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Band-winged Meadowhawk (Sympetrum semicinctum) by John Petranka, Sally Gewalt
Compare with: Autumn Meadowhawk   Ruby Meadowhawk   White-faced Meadowhawk   Cherry-faced Meadowhawk  
Identification Tips: Move the cursor over the image, or tap the image if using a mobile device, to reveal ID Tips.
Note: these identification tips apply specifically to mature males; features may differ in immature males and in females.

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Map
Click on county for list of all its records for Band-winged Meadowhawk
Flight Charts
Distribution This is another Northern meadowhawk, but its range extends southward in the mountains to northern GA. In NC, it is found mainly in the mountains and foothills of the Piedmont, but there are a few (older) records in the northern Piedmont away from the mountains (Rockingham, Caswell, and Franklin counties).
Abundance Uncommon in the northern mountains, but rare in the central and southern mountain counties; rare in the Piedmont foothills. Very rare east of the foothill ranges in the northern Piedmont. We have no recent reports from east of the mountains/foothills, which clearly indicates that the species has declined in recent decades in the Piedmont, as any bright red dragonfly is bound to attract attention!
Flight Mid-June to mid-September in the mountains; early June to early September in the Piedmont.
Habitat Unusual for most dragonflies, it favors marshes, bogs, and wet meadows for breeding -- as opposed to open ponds, lakes, rivers, or wide streams.
Behavior Adults forage from tips of grasses and sedges in or very close to marshes and bogs.
Comments Because this species seems to be tied to a fairly limited and specific habitat -- marshes, wet meadows, and bogs -- it can be specifically searched for. As the basal half of each wing is amber in color, coupled with the dull reddish abdomen, the male is quite unmistakable. It is more widespread in the mountains than is the White-faced Meadowhawk, which also can occur in cool/cold bogs, marshes, and other open wetlands.
State Rank S3
State Status
Global Rank G5
Federal Status
Synonym
Other Name
Species account update: LeGrand on 2023-01-17 10:21:12

Photo Gallery for Band-winged Meadowhawk   11 photos are shown. Other NC Galleries:    Jeff Pippen    Will Cook    Ted Wilcox
Photo 1 by: Rob Van Epps & Kevin Metcalf

Comment: Watauga, 2022-08-28, Clawson-Burnley Park
Photo 2 by: P Dixon

Comment: Haywood, 2022-07-12, Harmon Den meadows near horse camp, 35.761858680047766, -82.98522559935496
Photo 3 by: P Dixon

Comment: Madison, 2021-07-03, Davis Branch Meadows, Hot Springs area
Photo 4 by: Owen McConnell

Comment: Graham, 2018-07-02, First record for county, found in Tulula Wetlands - female
Photo 5 by: John Petranka, Sally Gewalt

Comment: Watauga, 2017-09-04, South Fork of the New River, Clawson-Burnley Park, Boone. - 5 males, 1 female. At the retention ponds. Male.
Photo 6 by: John Petranka, Sally Gewalt

Comment: Watauga, 2017-09-04, South Fork of the New River, Clawson-Burnley Park, Boone. - 5 males, 1 female. At the retention ponds. Female.
Photo 7 by: Curtis Smalling

Comment: Watauga, 2009-08-25. male & female. Meat Camp Creek Environmental Studies Area
Photo 8 by: Curtis Smalling

Comment: Watauga, 2009-08-25. male. Meat Camp Creek Environmental Studies Area
Photo 9 by: Ted Wilcox

Comment: Ashe, 2007-06-22, male
Photo 10 by: Beth Brinson

Comment: Clay, 2006-09-03, Buck Creek Barrens
Photo 11 by: Beth Brinson

Comment: Clay, 2006-09-03, Buck Creek Barrens