Hoppers of North Carolina:
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DELPHACIDAE Members: NC Records

Pissonotus brunneus - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- side view

© Kyle Kittelberger- note wing pattern

© Kyle Kittelberger- brachypter
Taxonomy
Family: DELPHACIDAESubfamily: Delphacinae
Taxonomic Author: Van Duzee, 1897
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A dark, blackish species with pale wing venation (in brachypters) and no spots on the face. There is a thin white line that crosses the face, and the bottom of the clypeus is pale, as are the legs. The first antennal segment is black while the second is a pale brown. Macropterous individuals lack the pale wing venation of brachypters. Adult brachypterous males are around 2.25 mm long, while females are around 2.71 mm; macropterous males are around 3.23 mm long while females are around 3.50 mm. (Bartlett, 2000)
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Eastern and central United States and Canada; also Mexico (UDEL)
Abundance: Recorded from several counties, likely more abundant in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found in grassy, brushy areas. Commonly found in upland, old-field situations (Bartlett, 2000)
Plant Associates: Erigeron quercifolius (oakleaf fleabane), Erigeron sp., Symphyotrichum puniceum (purplestem aster; Asteraceae); Lespedeza sp. (Fabaceae), Agrostis sp. (Poaceae) (UDEL)
Behavior:
Comment: Brachypterous adults are much more common that macropterous individuals. (BG)

Macropterous individuals of brunneus could be confused with P. binotatus macrotpers. However, brunneus lacks the black line on the second antennal segment (segment is pale) and binotatus tends to be quite shiny while brunneus is more dull colored.

Status: Native
Global and State Rank:
See also Habitat Account for General Successional Fields and Forblands

Species Photo Gallery for Pissonotus brunneus No Common Name

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Transylvania Co.
Comment: female; ID confirmed via specimen by C. Bartlett
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Transylvania Co.
Comment: female; ID confirmed via specimen by C. Bartlett
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Transylvania Co.
Comment: female; ID confirmed via specimen by C. Bartlett
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Watauga Co.
Comment: brushy, field-type habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Watauga Co.
Comment: brushy, field-type habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Watauga Co.
Comment: brushy, field-type habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Vance Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest, open forest, grassy patches
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Vance Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest, open forest, grassy patches