Hoppers of North Carolina:
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Gyponana procera - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- note dense reticulated wings

© Kyle Kittelberger- note dense reticulated wings

© Kyle Kittelberger- note dense reticulated wings
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: Iassinae
Taxonomic Author: DeLong, 1942
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A dark green species with extremely dense, finely reticulated wing venation, so reticulate that the longitudinal veins found on the wings of other Gyponana species are not present; the clavus (inner region of the wing) is densely reticulate as well, resulting in a continuous, reticulated wing. The pronotum has eight prominent longitudinal bands that continue onto the rounded head; the scutellum is a combination of dark and light green markings. This species is slender and large, one of the largest in the genus and perhaps the longest in the region. The size range for males is 9.5-10.5 mm in length; females are typically 10.5-11.5 mm (female Gyponanas tend to be 1.0 mm longer than males, though some are even longer). (Hamilton 1982)
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Primarily a species found in the western United States (CA-TX), records in the eastern U.S. likely are the result of translocations on ornamental plants due to horticulture, creating an eastern population of this species. [pers. comment A. Hamilton]
Abundance: Uncommon with few recent records from the Piedmont, with an old historical record from the 1950s or 60s (location unknown), likely more abundant in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found in mixed hardwood forest and open woodlands.
Plant Associates: Recorded from Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) (BG)
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: It is imperative to obtain a clear photo and measurements, as well as an underside view to determine sex for any specimens of heavily reticulated Gyponanas. TThere are four Gyponana species that can be found in the Southeast that have heavily reticulated wing venation: G. cana, G. procera, G. protenta and G. pruinosa (which does not appear to be a valid species anymore). Of these, P. cana is the smallest (males 7.5-8.5 mm) and G. procera is the largest (males 9.5-10.5 mm). Both pruinosa and protenta are similar in size: males of the former tend to be 8.5-9.5 mm long while males of the latter tend to be 9.0-10.0 mm. However, G. pruinosa is a more southern species, found from OK-GA and therefore less likely to show up in North Carolina; therefore, reticualted individuals in the middle of the size range are more likely to be protenta. Note that females of these species tend to be 1.0 mm longer than the range given for each species. (BG), (Hamilton 1982).

Not much is known about the biology of this species.

Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Gyponana procera No Common Name

Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 12.2 mm, one of 4 stuck in Tanglefoot on tree bands on Willow Oak
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 12.2 mm, one of 4 stuck in Tanglefoot on tree bands on Willow Oak
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 12.2 mm, one of 4 stuck in Tanglefoot on tree bands on Willow Oak
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 12.2 mm, one of 4 stuck in Tanglefoot on tree bands on Willow Oak
Photo by: Margarita Lankford
Orange Co.
Comment: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/34940755rnrnAttracted to UV light
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: near mixed hardwood forest habitat; 11.3 mm long
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: near mixed hardwood forest habitat; 11.3 mm long
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: near mixed hardwood forest habitat