Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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Cicadellidae Members: NC Records

Texananus majestus - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- male

© Kyle Kittelberger- male

© Kyle Kittelberger- female

© Kyle Kittelberger- female
Taxonomy
Family: CicadellidaeSubfamily: Deltocephalinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A large brownish species, with adults 9.0-10.0 mm long. The entire body and wings have a dense reticulated mesh-like dark brown pattern, extending onto the face. The vertex is bluntly angled and has a tan to white tip, in front of a conspicuous, irregular and broken transverse dark brown to fuscous band between the eyes; there are typically two fuscous spots in front of the band on the vertex. The anterior portion of the pronotum has dark vermiculate markings, and the wings are heavily mottled with chestnut-brown. The female pregenital sternite is three times as broad as long and has a narrow but deep medial incision, extending about halfway to the anterior margin; the posterior sides of the notch end in a somewhat sharp tooth, with the lateral posterior angles of the sternite broadly rounded. The pregenital sternite is mostly a light brown to tan color, with some darker mottling near the notch. The male subgenital plates are close to one another, without a noticeably gap between them; together, they are triangular in shape and are long and narrow with broad, blunt and rounded apices. (DeLong & Hershberger, 1948)

For diagrams of this species, see: Dmitriev. For more images of individuals that have supposedly been identified as this species, see: BG.

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Out of State Record(s)
Distribution: Primarily eastern and central United States
Abundance: Recorded from a couple counties in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain; likely more abundant in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Open woodlands
Plant Associates: Herbaceous plants
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: The three species of Texananus in the subgenus Iowanus that have been recorded in North Carolina are: caducus, longipennis, and majestus. These three species all visually resemble one another and therefore specimens in this subgenus can only conclusively be identified to species with a very clear, unobstructed view of the underside; the female pregenital sternite is quite distinctive among these three species, the male plates less so. In T. majestus, the subgenital plates tend to be proportionately longer than in the other two species; they appear elongated.
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Texananus majestus No Common Name

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: female; NCSU specimen
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: female; NCSU specimen
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: female; NCSU specimen
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: male; NCSU specimen
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: male; NCSU specimen
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: male; NCSU specimen