Moths of North Carolina
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Orthodes Members:
252 NC Records

Orthodes detracta (Walker, 1857) - Disparaged Arches Moth


Taxonomy
Superfamily: Noctuoidea Family: NoctuidaeSubfamily: NoctuinaeTribe: EriopyginiP3 Number: 933146.00 MONA Number: 10288.00
Comments: Information based primarily on molecular data and/or genitalia indicate that the genus that this species currently is assigned to is misapplied, but the correct genus to which it should be assigned has not been determined by experts. The genus name is sometimes placed in quotation marks ("Orthodes" detracta) to indicate the misapplied name.
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Covell (1984; as Polia detracta); Beadle and Leckie (2012)Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, iNaturalist, Google, BAMONA, GBIF, BOLD                                                                                 
Adult Markings: The ground color of the forewings is generally fuscous, lacking the red-brown color of goodelli, although there can be patches of tawny coloration, especially posterior to the claviform (Forbes, 1954). The claviform spot is a conspicuous, solid-black wedge and the subterminal line is grayish rather than reddish, as is characteristic of goodelli (Forbes, 1954, see key)
Wingspan: 30-35 mm (Forbes, 1954)
Adult Structural Features: Antennae of males are strongly serrate to subpectinate, unlike the simple antennae of males of goodelli (Forbes, 1954).
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution:
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ‚Č• 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Wagner et al. (2011) describe this species as a forest moth. Our records come almost entirely from mesic stands of hardwoods but in the Fall-line Sandhills, streamhead swamp forests are also used. No use of dry to xeric woodlands appears to exist.
Larval Host Plants: Larvae feed primarily on hardwood trees and shrubs. Wagner et al. (2011) list the buds of hickories and oaks, birch, blueberry, and serviceberry. In captivity, they can also feed on dead leaves. - View
Wikipedia
See also Habitat Account for General Mesic Hardwood Forests
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: G5 S4S5
State Protection: Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.
Comments:

 Photo Gallery for Orthodes detracta - Disparaged Arches Moth

Photos: 18

Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2023-06-25
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: David George, Ed Corey on 2023-06-17
Avery Co.
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Recorded by: B. Bockhahn on 2023-06-17
Avery Co.
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Recorded by: David George on 2023-06-16
Avery Co.
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Recorded by: David George, Stephen Dunn, Jeff Niznik on 2023-06-03
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Richard Teper on 2022-06-24
Avery Co.
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Recorded by: tom ward on 2022-05-17
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-06-05
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Ken Kneidel on 2021-05-29
Yancey Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2020-06-09
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2020-06-02
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Julie Tuttle on 2017-05-20
Chatham Co.
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Recorded by: Paul Scharf,B. Bockhahn, K. Kittelberger on 2015-06-19
Avery Co.
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Recorded by: B. Bockhahn, K. Kittelberger, P. Scharf on 2015-06-18
Avery Co.
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Recorded by: B. Bockhahn, K. Kittelberger, P. Scharf on 2015-06-18
Avery Co.
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Recorded by: Paul Scharf, B Bockhahn, K Kittelberger on 2014-06-07
Avery Co.
Comment: 4100\'
Recorded by: K. Bischof on 2013-07-06
Transylvania Co.
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Recorded by: Doug Blatny/Jackie Nelson on 2012-05-26
Ashe Co.
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