Moths of North Carolina
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View PDFTortricidae Members: 140 NC Records

Argyrotaenia velutinana (Walker, 1863) - Red-banded Leafroller Moth


Taxonomy
Superfamily: Tortricoidea Family: TortricidaeSubfamily: TortricinaeTribe: ArchipiniP3 Number: 620255.00 MONA Number: 3597.00
Comments: The genus Argyrotaenia contains approximately 100 described species, with most occurring in Nearctic and Neotropical regions. Thirty-six species are currently recognized in North America.
Species Status: The Red-banded Leafroller Moth has at times been a serious pest in apple orchards where it can damage the foliage and fruits. The adoption of integrated pest management has helped to reduce the severity of infestations, and it is generally considered to be a minor pest today.
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Covell (1984); Beadle and Leckie (2012); Leckie and Beadle (2018)Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, iNaturalist, Google, BAMONATechnical Description, Adults: Forbes (1923); Gilligan and Epstein (2020)Technical Description, Immature Stages: Gilligan and Epstein (2020)                                                                                 
Adult Markings: The following description is based in part on those of Forbes (1923) and Gilligan and Epstein (2020). The head, thorax, and ground color of the forewing vary from buff or pale ocherous to pale gray or white, and the thoracic tufts are dark purplish to reddish brown. The forewing typically has three prominent dark marks. A dark patch is present on the dorsal half of the wing that begin on the inner margin at about one-fifth the wing length. It extends inward to near the middle and usually has a prominent tooth that projects posteriorly. The most conspicuous mark is a broad median band that is usually dark red or purplish red, and often with purplish gray shadings or patches of black. It begins at about one-half the wing length and extends obliquely before ending on the inner margin before the tornus. The dorsal half is often lighter colored than the costal half. The last mark is a dark subapical patch along the costa. A smaller and often lighter patch often adjoins the costal patch towards the tornus, and these are sometimes joined to form a single elongated mark that originates at the costa. The subterminal region beyond the costal patch typically consists of a zone of off-white to duff scales. The lighter regions between the three dark patches or median band often have striations or patches of light brown scales. The hindwing is grayish brown. The males are slightly smaller than the females, lack a costal fold in the forewing, and have a median band that is darker than the reddish band of the females.
Wingspan: 12-16 mm (Forbes, 1923)
Forewing Length: 5.5-7.5 mm for males; 6.5-8.0 mm for female (Gilligan and Epstein, 2020)
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Immatures and Development: Argyrotaenia velutinana is highly polyphagous and feeds on numerous species of trees, shrubs, and herbaceous plants. Local populations typically have 2-4 generations per year, with northern populations having only two (Gilligan and Epstein, 2020). Following the spring warm-up, females lay masses of eggs on tree trunks or other substrates and the larvae move to the leaves of host plants either by crawling or dispersing via silk threads. When feeding on broadleaf trees such as apples, the early instars skeletonize the lower surface of a leaf along the midrib beneath a patch of silk. The penultimate instar then leaves and feeds on other leaves or fruits. Late instar larvae of the summer generations will often construct a shelter by webbing a leaf to a fruit such as an apple, then feed underneath on the fruit. In New York, the larvae complete development in about a month and move to the ground to pupate in a folded leaf. The adults eclose one to two weeks later (Gilligan and Epstein, 2020). The final brood often overwinters in the pupal stage and the adults eclose the following spring. Late instar larvae are 13-18 mm in length with a dull green to yellowish green abdomen. The head, prothoracic shield, and thoracic legs are yellowish green and unmarked (Gilligan and Epstein, 2020). The larvae often feed on the flower heads and inflorescences of herbaceous species such as ragweeds and wingstems, where they may spin loose webbing to some extent. When feeding on species with small leaves such as blueberries, they may bind leaves together to form a crude shelter.
Larvae ID Requirements: Identifiable only through rearing to adulthood.
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution: Argyrotaenia velutinana is widely distributed across central and eastern North America, including southern Canada from Manitoba eastward to Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. In the US the range extends from the New England states southward to northern Florida and westward to eastern Texas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, and North Dakota. This species occurs statewide in North Carolina, but is generally more common in the Piedmont and lower elevations in the mountains.
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: The adults have been found during all months of the year depending on latitude, but are most active from March through September in areas outside of North Carolina. As of 2021, our records extend from mid-February through December. Local populations in North Carolina appear to have two or three broods per year.
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: This highly polyphagous species occurs in a wide variety of communities, included hardwood forests, mixed conifer-hardwood forests, and sunny sites such as forest edges, open fields and roadsides.
Larval Host Plants: The larvae use a wide variety of hosts, including both conifers, hardwood trees, and herbaceous plants. Brown et al. (2008) list 29 genera of vascular plants. Examples of genera of vascular plants that are used include Abies, Acer, Alnus, Ambrosia, Apocynum, Betula, Geranium, Ilex, Lobelia, Lonicera, Picea, Prunus, Quercus, Salix, Tilia, Tsuga, Ulmus, and Vaccineum.
Observation Methods: The adults are attracted to lights and the larvae can be found on a variety of host plants.
Wikipedia
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: GNR S5
State Protection: Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.
Comments: This is a widespread and abundant species in the state and is secure.

 Photo Gallery for Argyrotaenia velutinana - Red-banded Leafroller Moth

136 photos are available. Only the most recent 30 are shown.

Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2021-11-21
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: David George on 2021-09-11
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-09-07
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-08-19
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: David George on 2021-08-12
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Lior Carlson on 2021-07-24
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Lior Carlson on 2021-07-23
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Simpson Eason on 2021-07-20
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-06-26
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: tom ward on 2021-06-15
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka, Bo Sullivan and Steve Hall on 2021-06-08
Scotland Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2021-05-21
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2021-05-19
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Dean Furbish on 2021-05-14
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2021-04-13
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Simpson Eason on 2021-04-12
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Simpson Eason on 2021-04-12
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: David L. Heavner on 2021-04-10
Chatham Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-04-10
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2021-04-04
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-03-28
Bladen Co.
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Recorded by: Vin Stanton on 2021-03-27
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-03-26
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Simpson Eason on 2021-03-24
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-03-24
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2021-03-21
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Simpson Eason on 2021-03-18
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Simpson Eason on 2021-03-18
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-03-17
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2021-03-11
Guilford Co.
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