Moths of North Carolina
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Caloptilia Members:
58 NC Records

Caloptilia bimaculatella (Ely, 1915) - No Common Name


Taxonomy
Superfamily: Gracillarioidea Family: GracillariidaeSubfamily: GracillariinaeTribe: [Gracillariini]P3 Number: 330117.00 MONA Number: 595.00
Comments: Caloptilia is a large genus with nearly 300 described species; 64 species have been described in North America north of Mexico. The larvae begin as leaf-mining sap-feeders, but the latter instars usually exit the mines and feed within a conical roll that begins at the leaf apex or at the tip of a leaf lobe.
Species Status: Caloptilia bimaculatella and C. speciosella are phenotypically similar species that both have two rounded, triangular marks (costal patches) on the forewing. Braun (1939) described the latter from Ohio and Kentucky, and specimens have not been collected from areas outside of this region since her original description. C. speciosella differs in having the triangular marks more separated (costal patches separated by ¼ to ½ the width of the larger patch), and in the coloration of the antennae and cilia of the forewings (purplish-fuscous in C. speciosella versus yellowish-gray in C. bimaculatella). The forewings are also more brilliantly purple in C. speciosella. Specimens from North Carolina vary markedly in the degree of separation of the costal patches and coloration of the antennae and cilia. Although certain specimens conform to the description of C. speciosella and others to C. bimaculatella, some appear intermediate between the two species. Here we treat all forms as C. bimaculatella until the status of C. speciosella is better resolved.
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Beadle and Leckie (2012)Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, BAMONATechnical Description, Adults: Beadle and Leckie (2012)                                                                                 
Adult Markings: The forewing ground color, the top of the head, and the top of the thorax are purplish to brown. The forewing has two golden, rounded triangles (costal patches) that often touch or nearly touch, and the middle one is larger - reaching almost to the dorsal edge of the wing. The face is white and the labial palps are white with dark tips. The tibia and femur of the front and middle leg are dark brown to purplish brown, while the tarsi are white with dark spots near the tarsal joints (often faint). The rear legs is uniformly light tan to whitish. Mark Shields has collected specimens from Onslow County on the coast that have the apical triangle greatly reduced or missing, but otherwise conform to C. bimaculatella. We elected to assigned these to C. bimaculatella, although they may represent an undescribed species.
Wingspan: 11 mm (Ely, 1915)
Forewing Length: Total length approximately 7 mm (Beadle and Leckie (2012)
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Immatures and Development: Details of early larval development are lacking, but this species presumably has a typical Caloptilia developmental sequence with early instars that are sap-feeding leaf-miners. The later instars feed within a conical roll that begins at the leaf apex or at the tip of a leaf lobe. The leaf rolls have been found on several species of maples, which are the host plants.
Larvae ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos, especially where associated with known host plants.
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution: This species is broadly distributed in eastern North America, with populations ranging from southern Canada southward to Florida and westward to near the Mississippi River. In North Carolina, our records as of 2019 are entirely from the Blue Ridge and Piedmont, even though maples are common in the Coastal Plain.
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: Caloptilia bimaculatella appears to be multivoltine, with adults active from mid-April through September.
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Caloptilia bimaculatella uses maples as host species and is primarily found in habitats with Red Maple (Acer rubrum), Sugar Maple (A. saccharum) and Silver Maple (Acer sacharinum). This includes mixed pine-hardwood forests, deciduous forests, as well as urban landscapes.
Larval Host Plants: Conical leaf rolls with larvae have been found on several species of maples in the eastern US, including Red Maple, Sugar Maple and Silver Maple (Eiseman, 2019).
Observation Methods: The adults are attracted to UV lights. Searching for larvae in the rolled leaf tips of maples may prove to be a productive way to document local populations.
Wikipedia
See also Habitat Account for General Maple Forests
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: GNR S4S5
State Protection: Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.
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 Photo Gallery for Caloptilia bimaculatella - No common name

55 photos are available. Only the most recent 30 are shown.

Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2022-07-01
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: David George, L. M. Carlson on 2022-06-21
Caswell Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2022-06-21
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2022-06-20
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2022-06-08
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2022-06-08
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2022-06-08
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2022-06-07
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2022-05-09
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2022-05-05
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: tom ward on 2022-05-04
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2022-04-30
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2022-04-22
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2022-04-21
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: David George, L. M. Carlson on 2021-08-21
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Bo Sullivan on 2021-08-02
Ashe Co.
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Recorded by: Simpson Eason on 2021-06-18
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Mark Shields on 2021-06-11
Onslow Co.
Comment: An unusual specimen that lacks the apical triangular mark.
Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-05-20
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-05-17
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-04-28
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-04-27
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-04-27
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-04-20
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2021-04-10
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka on 2021-04-09
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Mark Shields on 2021-04-08
Onslow Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-07-21
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2020-05-21
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Vin Stanton on 2020-05-14
Buncombe Co.
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